2016 Honda Accord Coupe V-6 Automatic

2016 Honda Accord Coupe V-6 Automatic

2016 Honda Accord Coupe V-6 Automatic


Instrumented Test 


A large number of the excellencies that make the Honda Accord a 10Best Cars–worthy family car likewise permit it to be a refined-yet-reasonable medium size Coupe—it's additionally the last family-vehicle nameplate to be offered in a two-entryway variation. In truth, there are a lot of additionally energizing two-entryway alternatives accessible in the Honda's value range, from the all-new 2016 Chevrolet Camaro to the Subaru BRZ and Toyota 86. In any case, the Accord stands separated for being less obviously energetic, and also for its front-wheel drive. Our past presentation to the 2016 Accord Coupe has been constrained to a V-6–powered EX-L variant with a six-speed manual gearbox; in this audit we analyze how the top-spec Touring model and its standard programmed transmission influence the experience. 

Honda upgraded the styling, elements of the Accord range for 2016, yet motor decisions persist: a 2.4-liter four-barrel with 185 drive and 181 lb-ft of torque, and a discretionary 3.5-liter V-6 creating 278 pull and 252 lb-ft of torque. Two-entryway models standard with a 6-speed manual of transmission paying little mind to motor decision, and a persistently variable programmed is a choice with the four-chamber. The V-6­–only Touring car, which is new to the lineup for 2016, is accessible just with an ordinary six-speed programmed, the same as every one of the six-barrel cars. 

Give up Control 

2016 Honda Accord Coupe V-6 Automatic


The Touring's programmed transmission and its additional hardware made our test case around 150 pounds heavier than the manual V-6 rendition. Regardless of the extra mass, this 3545-pound car was faster, mostly attributable to being less demanding to dispatch than its manual kin. It's about as fast as the six-barrel forms of the Chevy Camaro and the Ford Mustang, with our test auto requiring 5.6 seconds to achieve 60 mph versus the manual's 5.8. Both cars recorded the same 14.2-second go through the quarter-mile. A blazing footing control marker—or rich wheelspin in the event that you deactivate footing control—dependably goes with full-throttle getaways. 

Our watched normal of 22 mpg is not exactly the EPA's joined rating of 25 mpg, yet it's imaginable more illustrative of genuine proprietors would accomplish than the 19 mpg we recorded while beating the manual auto. For correlation, we've seen 22 mpg from Ford Mustangs with both the all the more intense 3.7-liter V-6 and the 2.3-liter EcoBoost four. 

In any case, giving the auto a chance to do all the work basically isn't as much fun as moving for yourself, particularly given the manual Accord's light and dynamic grip and the compensating, snickety-snick activity of its shifter. Conversely, the programmed feels dull and generally ease back to change gears, notwithstanding when utilizing the guiding wheel-mounted oars. (Despite everything we wouldn't see any problems those oars in the V-6 vehicle, in any case, where they're inaccessible.) Dropping the shifter into Sport mode brings a more forceful programming that holds equips longer, however it frequently still needs to chase for the best proportion. 



Family Ties 

2016 Honda Accord Coupe V-6 Automatic

In spite of the fact that the Accord Coupe's electrically helped directing is exact and strikingly firmer than the four-door's, being founded on a front-drive family car implies that our test auto conveyed 63 percent of its mass over the front pivot. This prompts heaps of protected, unsurprising understeer amid lively cornering, which means the Accord Coupe is to a greater degree a fantastic visiting machine. The Touring's 19-inch wheels (18s are standard on lesser trims), Michelin Primacy all-season tires offer unobtrusive grasp—0.85 g of parallel stick and a 70-to-zero-mph halting separation of 172 feet. The enormous wheels feel substantial and exasperate the Accord's generally commendable poise over harsh asphalt. 

 

With no back drive equipment to oblige, as in the Mustang and the Camaro and the Honda has 13 cubic feet of trunk space and a substantially more liberal rearward sitting arrangement that really is tenable for grown-up people. The front portion of the car's lodge is to a great extent the same as the four-door's and with agreeable seats and for the most part charming materials. We wish Honda would fit a bigger, high-res show with a computerized speedometer in the instrument group. Rather, the organization puts two vast screens on each other in the middle stack, both of which can control certain sound, route, and vehicle settings. It's an ungainly, excess setup by and by, with the lower unit a touchscreen and the upper to a great extent worked by means of directing wheel controls. 

The Accord car's vehicle inceptions likewise appear in its attractive, saved styling, which is rendered more strongly here than in its more pragmatic kin, yet the auto delivers less ballyhoo in activity than most other two-entryways.

Sensible Yet Sleepy 


As a down to earth, downplayed lively auto, the Accord V-6 offers a lot of quality for most Coupe purchasers, regardless of the possibility that Honda won't give you a chance to combine the manual with route and the greater part of the driver helps. However, just around five percent of the 350,000 or more Accords sold in 2015 were two-entryways, which is a wage contrasted and the volumes for horse autos. While that makes this car moderately elite, essentially the greater part of its execution and general goodness can be had in the Accord, alongside the utility of four entryways. Evacuate the one component that separates the two-entryway V-6 Accord—the fulfillment of a column your-own particular manual transmission—and the programmed Coupe is truly only a snappy, however less helpful, rendition of a car we truly adore.

While estimating for the four-chamber Accord Coupe begins at $24,710, V-6s start at $31,860 with the EX-L trim, which comes pleasantly outfitted with calfskin, warmed front seats, uninvolved passage, a force sunroof, double zone programmed atmosphere control, a 360-watt sound framework with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto network, and substantially more; the programmed transmission is a no-cost choice. The extent topping Touring raises the MSRP to $35,060 and includes LED headlights, route, and Honda's full lineup of driver-help advances—versatile voyage control, path takeoff cautioning and help, and forward-crash cautioning and relief—a few of which aren't yet accessible on other, also evaluated Coupe.